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10 high school football stadiums named after NFL players as seen via Google Earth - HIGHSCORE
10 high school football stadiums named after NFL players as seen via Google Earth
Video: Stadiums named after NFL players
See the view from above via Google Earth.

Athens (The Plains, Ohio) didn't waste any time in honoring its greatest athlete. It named the school's football stadium after Joe Burrow before he even took a professional snap from center.

According to Sports Illustrated, the Athens School District decided to rename the stadium after Burrow's heartfelt Heisman Trophy acceptance speech in which he named the school district.

Burrow's star continued to rise following the renaming as he led LSU to the national championship in January and was selected No. 1 in the NFL Draft by the Cincinnati Bengals in April.

Joe Burrow Stadium is one of 10 stadiums and football fields featured in our Google Earth series, which takes a new view of gridirons named after NFL players. See the full list below.

Joe Burrow Stadium: The stadium is where Burrow threw for 11,416 yards in a career in which he earned all-state honors.
Tony Romo Field: The latest field to be renamed at Burlington (Wis.), Tony Romo Field is located at Don Dalton Stadium. Dalton was Romo's coach at Burlington during the 1996 and 1997 seasons.
Joe Montana Stadium: Before leading the San Francisco 49ers to four Super Bowl championships, Montana was an all-state quarterback at Ringgold (Monongahela, Pa.).
John Elway Stadium: Elway was an All-American during his final two seasons at Granada Hills Charter (Granada Hills, Calif.) after transferring from Washington. The stadium seats 4,000 people and is located in the San Fernando Valley.
Emmitt Smith Field: The NFL's all-time leading rusher got his start at Escambia (Pensacola, Fla.), where he rushed for 8,804 yards and was named All-American.
Ronnie Lott Stadium: A native of New Mexico, Lott moved to Rialto, Calif., at a young age and attended Eisenhower. The school renamed the stadium in honor of the Hall of Famer safety in 2009.
Walter Payton Field: While Walter Payton College Prep High School can be found in Chicago, where he played his entire NFL career, Walter Payton Field is found at his high school alma mater in Columbia (Miss.).
Tony Dorsett Stadium: The all-time leading rusher in NCAA history by the time he finished his college career at Pitt, Dorsett began his career at Hopewell (Aliquippa, Pa.), where he was one of the top recruits in the country in 1973.
Brian Piccolo Memorial Stadium: While many NFL players have come from St. Thomas Aquinas (Fort Lauderdale, Fla.), the stadium is named after a former Raider who was the subject of Emmy-winning movie "Brian's Song." Piccolo played for the Chicago Bears and died from cancer in 1970. Actor James Caan played the role of Piccolo in the 1971 TV movie.
Brady Family Stadium: The stadium at Serra (San Mateo, Calif.) is named not just for NFL quarterback Tom Brady, but for his family, as Brady requested. The stadium was renamed for the Brady family in 2012.
High school baseball: All-time career home run leaders - HIGHSCORE
High school baseball: All-time career home run leaders
Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa thrilled Major League Baseball fans in 1998 with their race to break Roger Maris's home run record. High school baseball has its own version of the McGwire-Sosa battle when Jeff Clement of Marshalltown (Iowa) and James Peterson of Winterset (Iowa) competed in 2002 to become the nation's all-time home run leader.

Clement entered his senior season with 59 career home runs, including 21 in both his freshman and sophomore season. Peterson, meanwhile, started his junior season 12 home runs behind Clement, but closed the gap to one, 59-58, after out homering Clement 28-17 during their junior seasons.

That set up a 2002 season in which Clement and Peterson both tried to slug their way to the national record of 70 career home runs, set by Drew Henson of Brighton (Mich.) from 1995-98. Clement jumped out to a fast start and tied Henson with No. 70 on July 1 (Iowa plays a summer baseball season). He moved past Henson six at-bats later on July 3. Peterson, meanwhile, had fallen off the pace and was at 68 career homers, including one on the same day that Clement broke the record.

However, while Clement hit just one more home run over the next 13 days while Peterson went on a tear, homering four times. He tied Clement at 72 on July 16. Clement regained the lead with his 73rd home run on July 18 and Peterson tied him again with his 73rd on July 19. The duo entered the state tournament on July 25 tied at 73. Clement played in the 4A tournament and Peterson competed in the 3A tournament.

That's where Peterson's good fortune ended and Clement's began. Clement hit home runs in his first two at-bats in the first game of the tournament for No. 74 and 75 while Peterson went homerless in Winterset's first-round loss. Marshalltown went on to win the 4A championship.

Clement remains the all-time high school home run king of the spring season, but the record has received some challengers over the past decade, including Taylor Hawkins of Carl Albert (Midwest City, Okla.) in 2012 with 72 career home runs and Christian Stewart of Providence Christian Academy (Lilburn, Ga.), who ended his career in 2012 with 69.

Another player who came close is Brendan McCurry of Roff (Okla.), who ended his spring career with 72. However, if spring and fall seasons are counted together, McCurry has an astounding 130 career home runs. Other spring-fall players with triple digit home run totals include Will Hunt of Asher (Okla.) with 106 and Kyle Wingfield of Rock Creek (Bokchito, Okla.) with 100.

MaxPreps has compiled a list of players with 50 or more career spring home runs. All but one player on the list reached the milestone prior to 2014. Slade Wilks of Columbia Academy (Miss.) reached 50 last year before COVID ended his season.

Butch Harris of Broken Bow (Okla.) reached 50 home runs first, finishing with 51 in 1986. Dan Ruff of Fairfield Christian Academy (Lancaster, Ohio) took the national lead with 53 in 1987 and Will Hunt of Asher (Okla.) moved to the top in 1989 with 62. Paul Morse of Danville (Ky.) took over first place with 65 home runs in 1992 and Henson claimed the all-time lead in 1998 with 70, setting up the race to the top between Clement and Peterson.

Sources include the NFHS record book, state association record books, Cal-Hi Sports Record Book by Mark and Nelson Tennis, Oklahoma Baseball Coaches Association record book, MaxPreps leaderboards and newspapers accessed via newspapers.com.

Joey Gallo, Bishop Gorman
File photo by Alyson Boyer Rode
Joey Gallo, Bishop Gorman
High school baseball all-time career home run leaders

1.   75 — Jeff Clement, Marshalltown (Iowa), 1999-2002
2.   73 — James Peterson, Winterset (Iowa), 1999-2002
3.   72 — Brendan McCurry, Roff (Okla.), 2007-10
3.   72 — Taylor Hawkins, Carl Albert (Midwest City, Okla.), 2009-12
5.   70 — Drew Henson, Brighton (Mich.), 1995-98
6.   69 — Micah Owings, Gainesville (Ga.), 1999-2002
6.   69 — Christian Stewart, Providence Christian Academy (Lilburn, Ga.), 2009-12
8.   67 — Joey Gallo, Bishop Gorman (Las Vegas), 2009-12
9.   66 — Nick Masonia, Brooks (Killen, Ala.), 2007-11
9.   66 — Gavin LaValley, Carl Albert (Okla.), 2011-14
11.  65 — Paul Morse, Danville (Ky.), 1988-92
11.  65 — Kevin Bookout, Stroud (Okla.), 1999-2002
13.  63 — Mike Wilson, Central (Marlow, Okla.), 1993-96
13.  63 — Kyle Wingfield, Rock Creek (Bokchito, Okla.), 1996-99
13.  63 — Rich Witten, Danville (Ky.), 2003-07
13.  63 — Clint Frazier, Loganville (Ga.), 2010-13
17.  62 — Will Hunt, Asher (Okla.), 1986-89
17.  62 — Matt Robbins, Calhoun (Ga.), 1999-2002
19.  60 — Heath Graham, Stringer (Miss.), 1989-93
19.  60 — Steven Lerud, Galena (Reno, Nev.), 2000-03
19.  60 — Kevin Cron, Mountain Pointe (Phoenix, Ariz.), 2008-11
22.  58 — Jeremy Reed, Lookout Valley (Chattanooga, Tenn.), 1995-98
22.  58 — Matt Ames, Stanhope Elmore (Millbrook, Ala.), 1996-99
22.  58 — Brian Barnett, McQueen (Reno, Nev.), 2005-07
22.  58 — Blake Logan, Roff (Okla.), 2007-10
26.  57 — Jake Fields, Jefferson (Ga.), 2007-10
27.  55 — Jeff Francouer, Parkview (Lilburn, Ga.), 1999-2002
27.  55 — David Thompson, Westminster Christian (Miami, Fla.), 2009-12
29.  54 — Tyler Williams, Davenport North (Davenport, Iowa), 1986-89
29.  54 — Rod Walker, Morristown-Hamblen West (Morristown, Tenn.), 1986-89
29.  54 — Wade Miller, Long (Skipperville, Ala.), 1997-00
29.  54 — Jon Mark Owings, Gainesville (Ga.), 2001-04
33.  53 — Dan Ruff, Fairfield Christian Academy (Lancaster, Ohio), 1984-87
33.  53 — John Sanders, Tishomingo County (Iuka, Miss.), 1986-89
33.  53 — Dayne Parker, Roff (Okla.), 2007-10
33.  53 — Tim Barry, Oak Forest (Ill.), 2008-11
33.  53 — Jose Trevino, John Paul II (Corpus Christi, Texas), 2008-11
38.  52 — Shon Walker, Harrison County (Cynthiana, Ky.), 1989-92
38.  52 — Matt Daeges, Harlan (Iowa), 1996-2000
38.  52 — Taylor Harbin, Travelers Rest (S.C.), 1999-2004
38.  52 — Mike Moustakas, Chatsworth (Calif.), 2004-07
38.  52 — Jordan Adams, Newman Catholic (Mason City, Iowa), 2005-09
43.  51 — Butch Harris, Broken Bow (Okla.), 1983-86
43.  51 — Jared Martin, Riverton Parke (Montezuma, Ind.), 1998-01
43.  51 — Jake Goodwin, Parkers Chapel (El Dorado, Ark.), 1999-02
43.  51 — Justin Pickett, White House (Tenn.), 2001-04
43.  51 — Shane Dougherty, Rockwood (Tenn.), 2005-08
43.  51 — Justin O'Connor, Cowan (Muncie, Ind.), 2007-10
49.  50 — Brad Wilson, Towns County (Hiawassee, Ga.), 1986-89
49.  50 — Joe Little, Butner (Cromwell, Okla.), 1995-97
49.  50 — Jonathan Johnson, Unicoi County (Erwin, Tenn.), 1996-98
49.  50 — Drew Miller, Long (Skipperville, Ala.), 1995-98
49.  50 — Tommy Pearce, Marion (Ind.), 1995-98
49.  50 — Josh Gray, Rock Creek (Bokchito, Okla.), 1998-2000
49.  50 — Mike Breyman, Seneca East (Attica, Ohio), 1997-2000
49.  50 — Tyler Howe, Goose Lake (Iowa), 2000-04
49.  50 — Russ Henderson, Lexington (Tenn.), 2008-11
49.  50 — Slade Wilks, Columbia Academy (Columbia, Miss.), 2015-20
North Carolina high school football: Schedule, scores for NCHSAA state championship games - HIGHSCORE
North Carolina high school football: Schedule, scores for NCHSAA state championship games
The North Carolina High School Athletic Association will host eight football state championship games featuring 10 undefeated teams beginning Thursday at the University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University.

Four title games — 1A, 2AA, 3A, 4AA — will be hosted at North Carolina State's Finley Stadium starting Thursday with the 2AA contest between Salisbury (8-2) and St. Pauls (8-0). It concludes Saturday with the 4AA tilt between Rolesville (9-0) and the state's No. 1 ranked team, Zebulon B. Vance (9-1).

The other four championship games — 1AA, 2A, 3AA, 4A — will be played at North Carolina's Kenan Stadium, starting Thursday with the 3AA contest between a pair of 10-0 squads, Mount Tabor and Cleveland. Two Saturday games finish off the championships, concluding with the 2A game between Mountain Heritage (7-1) and Reidsville (9-0).

In all, the 16 teams have combined for records of 140 wins and just eight defeats. All eight games with be broadcast on the NFHS Network.

The NCHSAA was one of 15 states to bypass traditional fall football due to the pandemic. Of the 11 states that played football in the spring, only three opted for playoffs and to crown state champions. Virginia did so last week and North Carolina and Rhode Island wrap up football championships for the 2020-21 season this week.

Among the many standouts in the championship games is Havelock senior running back Kamarro Edmonds, a 5-foot-11, 227 pound senior who has rushed for 916 yards and 15 touchdowns in eight games. He's ranked the No. 16 senior in the state by 247Sports and headed to North Carolina.

Also a basketball star who averaged over 30 points per game this year, Reidsville senior wide receiver Breon Pass is ranked the state No. 28 senior recruit overall after catching 83 passes for more than 1,400 yards and 27 touchdowns in his career heading into this season.
Havelock senior running back Kamarro Edmonds has signed to the University of North Carolina.
File photo by Carin-Goodall Gosnell
Havelock senior running back Kamarro Edmonds has signed to the University of North Carolina.
NCHSAA Football Championships

1A
Full bracket can be found here - 2020-2021 Football Championships 1A
High school basketball: First-team HIGHSCORE All-American TyTy Washington commits to Kentucky - HIGHSCORE
High school basketball: First-team MaxPreps All-American TyTy Washington commits to Kentucky
MaxPreps first team All-America selection and Arizona Player of the Year TyTy Washington of AZ Compass Prep (Chandler, Ariz.) announced Wednesday he will attend the University of Kentucky next season. The rapidly rising 6-foot-3 guard looks to help the Wildcats after a 9-16 finish last season.

The future Wildcat averaged 24 points, seven assists and six rebounds and was among the leading candidates for MaxPreps National Player of the Year honors. Washington led AZ Compass Prep to a 28-2 record and No. 2 ranking in final MaxPreps Top 25 rankings, the first for the school.

Washington began the season as the 57th overall prospect in the Class of 2021, according 247Sports rankings. The elite guard prospect rose to five-star status and is regarded as the No. 16 prospect, according to 247Sports' most recent update.

MaxPreps All-America Teams: Overall | Junior | Sophomore | Freshman | Coach of the Year

Washington chose Kentucky over Arizona, Baylor, Kansas, LSU and Oregon. Washington most recently starred in the Iverson Classic, where he recorded a game-high 22 points against the nation's top high school players and won the 3-point shootout.

The guard should make an immediate impact in the SEC next season as the potential one-and-done prospect will likely be inserted into the starting rotation as a freshman.
TyTy Washington announced he'll play for the University of Kentucky next season.
Photo by Mark Jones
TyTy Washington announced he'll play for the University of Kentucky next season.

May Manning adds own title to one of America's most famous sports families - HIGHSCORE
May Manning adds own title to one of America's most famous sports families
It's been almost three weeks, but May Manning still has trouble piecing together the final, frantic yet joyous sequence of her last competitive high school volleyball match.

But she vividly recalls the feeling. And it hasn't left her.

"It happened so fast," she said. "I still get chills every time I watch that last point."

The fifth-year varsity player and third-year captain dove so hard to the Pontchartrain Center floor for a dig that she didn't hear the referee's final whistle. An opposing hitter had brushed the net. It was point, set and match, and triggered a wild, raucous celebration near midcourt.

The Academy of the Sacred Heart (New Orleans), a small all-girls Roman Catholic school founded in 1867, had won the Louisiana state Division IV girls volleyball championship in four sets Nov. 14 over favored Pope John Paul II.
May Manning played her fifth season as outside hitter and middle blocker in 2020 for the state-champion Cardinals.
Photo by Gregory Juan
May Manning played her fifth season as outside hitter and middle blocker in 2020 for the state-champion Cardinals.
May, the oldest grandchild of New Orleans Saints quarterback Archie Manning and niece of future NFL Hall of Famers Peyton and Eli, was awarded the game's Most Valuable Player plaque, thanks to 14 kills and some tenacious defense.

"I saw everyone on the dog pile," she said. "I was late to the celebration. I said (to her team), ‘It's over? It's over?' Of course everyone was crying and yelling and cheering. I was on Cloud Nine. I don't really remember all the details from there. I was so overcome with emotion and joy. There was so much happiness."

For so many reasons.

It was the Cardinals' first state crown since 2006, and 14th overall, and came against a squad that had won three titles in four years and downed Sacred Heart earlier in the season.

"We went into the playoffs thinking, 'Hey, we're the underdogs here. Let's take advantage of that and surprise some people,' " May said.

The Sacred Heart title came a season after a 2019 dud that ended below .500 and with an early playoff exit, followed by a year that was beaten and battered by COVID-19. Practice schedules and matches were altered or skipped; fans were required to largely stay home.

"We were just lucky to play this year," May said.

Especially fortunate for May who knew she wouldn't play after 2020. Her focus by next summer will be on college, academics and new surroundings. A game she's played year-round for Cajunland Volleyball since she was 9 would be in the rear view mirror.

"It feels funny that that was my last volleyball match ever," she said. "It's bittersweet that it's over. But that's the only way you want to end a career. With a state title."

Especially with all the family who had given her so much in attendance, all decked out in bright Cardinal reds and Sacred Heart swag.

Mom and May
Leading the charge was her mom Ellen, a 1987 Sacred Heart graduate and talented 5-9 middle hitter on the volleyball team. May's mother, then Ellen Heidingsfelder, and current assistant coach Betsy Laborde (then Becker) propelled the Cardinals to the school's first state title as seniors in 1986. 

Ellen, like May, was named the championship game's MVP of that title game, a fact she didn't reveal until after last month's match.
Ellen (left) and May Manning each led their Academy of the Sacred Heart teams to state titles.
Photo courtesy of the Manning family
Ellen (left) and May Manning each led their Academy of the Sacred Heart teams to state titles.
"I never told her because I didn't want to put that kind of pressure on her," Ellen said. "This was her deal, but when they announced (May) won the same award it was like ‘Oh yeah, our careers do kind of parallel.' … It's not like, ‘Whoa back in my day,' but we did go to the same school and our banner is up there on the wall. We have the first and May's team will go up soon as the most recent. That will be fun."

Being a Sacred Heart athlete is in May Manning's genes as her mother and late grandmother Dot both attended along with Ellen's two sisters. Ellen was recently inducted into the Sacred Heart Sports Hall of Fame, and the strong influence of women athletes on her mom's side makes May proud.

This Manning family isn't just an old boys' network. 

"I definitely think her accomplishments get forgotten because the Mannings are so much in the spotlight," May said. "The Mannings are great athletes but I get my volleyball talents and ability from my mom. She could really pop the ball from what I've heard."

Ellen downplays her own glory days. This was May's time and Sacred Heart's return to the top.

"It was so much fun because it was so unexpected," she said. "I think they surprised themselves. ... It was a fabulous way to end her volleyball career. She ended on a high note. It was icing on the cake. I'm still smiling about it."

Dad and May
May's dad Cooper is grinning also. He is the oldest of Archie and Olivia's three boys and by many accounts, the most athletic.

A quarterback-turned-receiver, Cooper likely would've been the first Manning son to reach the NFL if a serious back ailment (spinal stenosis) hadn't ended his football career as a freshman at the University of Mississippi. It was a cruel and tough setback for Cooper, the husband and father of three who landed squarely and softly on his feet in the real estate market and as a TV host on Fox's "The Manning Hour." He's done well as Principal and Senior Managing Director of Investor Relations for AJ Capital Partners. 

But he struck gold meeting Ellen, a licensed attorney, and the couple have been married 21 years. They also have raised two athletic boys, Arch Manning and Heid Manning, both members of the Newman (New Orleans) football squad. The Greenies (8-0), the top seed in the Division III playoffs, host Catholic (New Iberia) at 7 p.m. today in a quarterfinal game.

Arch is the nation's top-rated sophomore quarterback and Heid, a promising freshman offensive lineman.

"When Coop and I decided to have kids it was decided he'd be the breadwinner and I run the household," Ellen said. "It has worked out perfectly so we stuck with it."
May Manning with her father Cooper Manning.
Photo courtesy of the Manning family
May Manning with her father Cooper Manning.
Cooper didn't just spend time running the boys to ball fields. May played as many sports as the boys, maybe more, including swimming, gymnastics, soccer and tennis. Cooper, in fact, did most of the traveling with May to out-of-area volleyball tournaments. 

"We've had a lot of late Sunday night drives home and a lot of late airport layovers together," he said. "It's been a lot of fun; everything about it. It's been a terrific bonding experience with my daughter. She's always been a delight to be there for.

"Selfishly, it was neat to see it all come together for her last game of her career. A lot of girls playing and all their parents have been through the same journey. It was really sweet. May and all those girls put in a lot of work. It's been a rough year for a lot of seniors across the country in sports. I'm thrilled they got something to hang onto that was so positive."

He admitted getting pretty choked up when May got the MVP award.

"It was well deserved," Cooper said. "They had a lot of different girls all season that could have been MVP. But May never comes off the court. I would say she was their vocal leader."

The boys
There was plenty of hollering during May's championship match from her younger brothers, along with a group of other Newman football players behind the Pope John Paul II bench.

The Manning siblings are tight and all within four years in age. The boys would have made more volleyball matches this season, but COVID restrictions kept them away. Nothing restricted them on championship day. May noticed all the Greenies, dressed in Sacred Heart colors, and even volleyball practice jerseys.
The Manning family left-to-right: Arch, Heid, Ellen, May and Cooper.
Photo courtesy of the Manning family
The Manning family left-to-right: Arch, Heid, Ellen, May and Cooper.
"They must have raided my closet," she said. "They took all the Sacred Heart gear they could find. It was great."

Roughly 300 fans were allowed into the title match and the football kids were perhaps the loudest. Their enthusiasm and excitement has barely simmered. 

"The boys were super proud of their sister," Ellen said. "Arch told me the following week, ‘Mom, I've been smiling all weekend about it.' People, he said, were congratulating him. It's just been a neat experience for all of us."

Sibling competition can sometime get complicated, especially in a spotlighted home like the Mannings.

Arch, for instance, was the 2019 MaxPreps national Freshman of the Year and recently he played and was featured on ESPNU. He's considered one of the most coveted recruits from any class and recognizable prep athletes in the country.

Cooper, with a unique perspective, said sibling rivalries don't exist in the household and he's rarely had to address it, if at all.

"They all support and love each other," he said. "Everyone is equally excited for others' successes. If I ever have to talk about it, I would simply say: ‘Look at me. I'm a guy who has two brothers that won Super Bowls and been on the highest level and I've been nothing but thrilled for them. Jealousy is a nasty thing, so let's never go there.' "

May jokes about Arch's sudden arc to stardom in the last year.

"It's obviously weird when you see your little brother on national TV and 20 minutes later he's complaining about something or eating a bowl of Frosted Flakes at the kitchen table," she said. "It's like, ‘Wait, is this the same person?'

"As we've gotten older we've got closer. All our friends hang out together. But he'll always be my little brother. It will definitely be weird seeing him on TV in interviews or getting fan mail later. I don't think any of it right now affects him. He's oblivious to it sometimes. He doesn't realize that it's kind of a big deal. … Arch is probably one of the most humble people I've ever known."

Family matters
May's grandparents Archie and Olivia (Cooper's parents) and Charles Heidingsfelder (Ellen's father) also attended her championship match. They've been there every step of the way, May said. 

"They (Archie and Olivia) raised just boys playing football, basketball and baseball, so they'd never been to a swim meet, gymnastics events or girls basketball and soccer games, yet they were there for me," May said. "He (Heidingsfelder) told me after the match that between his daughters and other grandchildren he'd been going to matches for 40 years and that our match was his last. It was a great finish for him, too."
Front row (L-R): Heid Manning, Ellen Manning. Backrow (L-R): Charles Heidingsfelder, Jane Heidingsfelder, Archie Manning, May Manning, Olivia Manning, Arch Manning and Cooper Manning.
Photo courtesy of the Manning family
Front row (L-R): Heid Manning, Ellen Manning. Backrow (L-R): Charles Heidingsfelder, Jane Heidingsfelder, Archie Manning, May Manning, Olivia Manning, Arch Manning and Cooper Manning.

Dot joined Charles at many of May's games before a long bout with Parkinson's disease and dementia was finally cut short in March by COVID-19. Dot was 77. 

"She went to all the games even when she wasn't her best," Ellen said. "I wear a little bracelet that says 'Mom' on it. (Before last month's title match) I said 'OK mom, let's go root on May.' She would have been thrilled."

That kind of support from family and friends has helped May thrive, she said, and live easy in The Big Easy — even as a Manning.

"I think my friends and Arch's friends make it all so normal, so comfortable," May said. "It's not as big a deal as it might seem. Obviously my grandfather played for the Saints, my uncles played in the NFL. Everyone in New Orleans knows the Mannings and is so used to it."

Going to Sacred Heart has also helped with the spotlight or possible scrutiny, she said.

"To be honest, I've never felt pressure to succeed or play sports or anything," she said. "Not from my family, my friends or people in New Orleans. I really think going to an all-girls school helped with that.

"I'm sorta trying to start my own legacy. It is more May vs. May Manning which has been a blessing. If I do feel pressure, it's me putting pressure on myself, not anyone else. I'm lucky for that."

Ultimately, her healthy perspective comes back to a balanced, enthusiastic family who shows its true color, whether at championship matches or practice or school.

"I think it's everybody — my parents, my grandparents, my brothers," she said. "It's just having such a huge support system that's so separate from football.

"From the beginning my parents made it clear: ‘You like sports, play sports. If you don't like sports, you don't have to do it.' I do it for me because I love to compete and I love my teams."

For the first time, she's attempting four sports this school year, including basketball currently, and golf and tennis in the spring. She's been on the tennis team since the sixth grade.

She said the best way to cap her senior season would be if her brothers dive in and grab Newman's first football state title. 

"Arch told me how cool it was to watch us win the state title and I told him 'I hope y'all win one too,' " May said. "It's the best feeling ever."
May Manning helped lead Academy of the Sacred Heart to its 14th state title but first since 2006 last month.
Photo by Gregory Juan
May Manning helped lead Academy of the Sacred Heart to its 14th state title but first since 2006 last month.
Ellen Manning (Heidingsfelder) sits in the middle front row right behind the 1986 Academy of the Sacred Heart state title trophy. To her left is Betsy Laborde (Becker) who was an assistant coach for the Cardinals in 2020.
Photo courtesy of the Manning family
Ellen Manning (Heidingsfelder) sits in the middle front row right behind the 1986 Academy of the Sacred Heart state title trophy. To her left is Betsy Laborde (Becker) who was an assistant coach for the Cardinals in 2020.
Newman football players pose with state champion May Manning.
Photo courtesy of the Manning family
Newman football players pose with state champion May Manning.