Download News High School Sport Today - HIGHSCORE


Tyrese Hunter named 2020-21 HIGHSCORE Wisconsin High School Basketball Player of the Year - HIGHSCORE
Tyrese Hunter named 2020-21 MaxPreps Wisconsin High School Basketball Player of the Year
Each year since 2006, MaxPreps has recognized outstanding performers in high school basketball. America's source for high school sports continues the tradition to close out the 2020-21 season by naming the top player in each state. Selections are based on team success and individual excellence, in addition to local and state accolades.

Tyrese Hunter of St. Catherine's (Racine) is the 2020-21 MaxPreps Wisconsin High School Basketball Player of the Year. The 6-foot-1, 175-pound senior helped the Angels go 28-1 en route to the Division 3 state championship.

Although Hunter was hampered by a nagging ankle injury throughout the Angels' title run, he led the team in scoring and assists averaging 18.9 points, 6.3 rebounds, 4.6 assists and 2.7 steals per game on the season.

Hunter was a four-year starter for St. Catherine's, compiling 1,589 points while leading the program to a record of 91-12. He posted career averages of 16.6 points, 5.2 rebounds and 3.5 assists per contest.

Signed with Iowa State, Hunter is regarded as the No. 36 prospect in the Class of 2021 overall according to 247Sports. Arizona State, Connecticut, Creighton, Florida, Louisville and Texas Tech were among the other college basketball programs to extend offers.

Each state's MaxPreps Player of the Year will be considered for inclusion in the MaxPreps All-America Team, which is scheduled to be released April 13.
NFL Draft: 10 players who could've been first-round picks out of high school - HIGHSCORE
NFL Draft: 10 players who could've been first-round picks out of high school
The NFL Draft is set for tonight in Cleveland, Ohio, with 32 NFL teams prepared to choose from among the nation's best college players. But what if they were able to choose high school players?

Baseball, hockey and basketball professional leagues have all drafted players right out of high school while the NFL requires a player to be three years removed from his graduating class. Opponents of drafting players out of high school into the NFL site maturity level, physical strength and quickness and knowledge of the game as reasons why prep players just aren't ready.

However, there are always those precocious players mature beyond their years who possess the size, strength and speed to compete at the professional level. The emergence of Clemson quarterback Trevor Lawrence as a "once-in-a-generation talent" leads those to wonder if Lawrence might have been a first-round pick right out of high school.

MaxPreps takes a look at 10 players, including Lawrence, who were "once-in-a-generation talents" in their own day. Not all of them succeeded in the NFL while others have gone on to be Hall of Famers. The argument here is that all 10 were phenoms coming out of high school and highly likely that some NFL general manager would have been willing to take a first-round gamble on their potential.
Jadeveon Clowney, South Pointe
File photo by Ron McCann
Jadeveon Clowney, South Pointe
10 NFL-ready players out of high school

Trevor Lawrence, Cartersville (Ga.), 2017
Resume:
The presumptive first pick in this year's draft has been the nation's most coveted quarterback since his freshman year at Cartersville. The No. 1 ranked quarterback in his class throughout his high school career, he's been labeled by some scouts as the greatest quarterback prospect of all-time, along with Hall of Famer John Elway. He became a starter early in his freshman season at Clemson and led the Tigers to a national championship.
Why he would be drafted: At 6-foot-6 and and 208 pounds, Lawrence definitely had the size that NFL scouts like to see in a quarterback. However, he also has arm strength, quickness, maneuverability in the pocket, and passing instincts that make him a once in a generation playcaller.

Herschel Walker, Johnson County (Wrightsville, Ga.), 1979
Resume:
He was the biggest thing to ever happen in Wrightsville (Ga.) in 1979. Colleges from all over the country came to the small town of 2,000 people to watch Walker practice. He rushed for 3,167 yards and 45 touchdowns as a senior, a rushing record that lasted for 21 years. He was a Heisman Trophy candidate as a true freshman after rushing for 1,616 yards. He left Georgia after his junior year to play football in the USFL and eventually played 12 seasons in the NFL.
Why would he be drafted: Very few running backs coming out of high school have ever had the total package that Walker presented. At 6-foot-2, 220 pounds, he was big for a halfback. However, he was also the fastest player on the field — he won the 100 and 200-yard dashes at the state meet — and one of the strongest, he was a state shot put champion as well.

Jadeveon Clowney, South Pointe (Rock Hill, S.C.), 2011
Resume:
The No. 1 overall pick in the 2014 NFL draft, Clowney had strong credentials as a edge rusher coming out of high school. He had 69.5 sacks in his three years on the varsity, including 29.5 as a senior when he was regarded as the nation's No. 1 overall recruit regardless of position. He was a two-time All-American in college at South Carolina, starting as a freshman and essentially recognized as college football's best defensive player by his sophomore season. He's a three-time Pro Bowler in the NFL.
Why would he be drafted: Clowney was not only viewed as the top player in the class of 2014, but that he would have been the top player in many other classes as well. At 6-5, 250 pounds, he'd already developed into a player capable of playing at a much higher level.

Adrian Peterson, Palestine (Texas), 2003
Resume:
One of the more recent players who could have made the jump, Peterson was the national player of the year while running for 2,950 yards as a senior in 2003. The following year as a true freshman, Peterson finished second in the Heisman Trophy voting after rushing for 1,925 yards. He has since gone on to become the fifth all-time leading rusher in NFL history.
Why would he be drafted: Peterson has given several interviews to ESPN, noting that he felt he was capable of making the jump from high school to the pros. According to an article by Len Pasquarelli in 2007, Peterson is often named by talent evaluators as the player who most capable of making the jump.

Marcus Dupree, Philadelphia (Miss.), 1981
Resume:
The most prized high school prospect in the nation in 1981, Dupree scored on his very first possession as a freshman and finished his career with 87 touchdowns. When he arrived on campus at Oklahoma, head coach Barry Switzer reportedly said, "He was the best player on the field ... physically ready, as a true freshman, to be the best player on a great college team. Maybe even ready for the NFL at that age." Dupree came through as a freshman, rushing for 1,144 yards and earning second team All-America honors. However, he left Oklahoma after his freshman year and ended up playing the USFL at the age of 19. After a brief stint with the Los Angeles Rams, Dupree was out of the NFL due to injuries.
Why would he be drafted: Dupree was 210 pounds as a freshman in high school, eventually growing to 235 pounds. He also had sprinter speed, reportedly posting a 4.29 40-yard dash.

Andy Katzenmoyer, Westerville South (Westerville, Ohio), 1995
Resume:
A 6-foot-5, 240-pound linebacker in high school, Katzenmoyer devastated opponents with his speed and instincts. He was named the best player, not just linebacker, in the Detroit Free Press's Best in the Midwest rankings. USA Today named him National Defensive Player of the Year. He was Mr. Football in Ohio. He was also the top linebacker on the Parade Magazine All-America team. As a true freshman at Ohio State, he beat out a Butkus Award finalist from the year before, Greg Bellisari, at middle linebacker and set school records for sacks and tackles for loss while earning All-Big Ten honors. Ohio State had the nation's top passing defense with Katzenmoyer leading the way.
Why would he be drafted: Speed, instinct and tackling ability were Katzenmoyer's trademarks (his coach at Westerville South held him out of tackling drills to prevent other players from getting hurt, according to the Detroit Free Press). A neck injury as a rookie brought a premature end to his career.

Cookie Gilchrist, Har-Brack (Natrona Heights, Pa.), 1953
Resume:
Gilchrist was the top player in Pennsylvania in 1953. Just a junior, Gilchrist was one of the leading scorers in the state with 184 points on 24 touchdowns and 42 extra points. He earned all-state honors, receiving the most votes on the team. The problem for Gilchrist, however, is that he was ineligible to play as a senior. WPIAL rules prevented any senior who turned 19 prior to Sept. 1 from playing. Gilchrist turned 19 in May of his junior year. Fortune found Gilchrist in the form of Cleveland Browns coach Paul Brown, who signed Gilchrist to a contract. However a disagreement led to Gilchrist leaving the Browns. He did play in the Ontario Rugby Union (a precursor to the Canadian Football League) as a 19-year-old. He later played in the AFL and was the AFL MVP in 1962.
Why would he be drafted: Obviously talented enough to gain the attention of Paul Brown, who had coached the Browns to an 11-1 record and a runner-up finish to Detroit in the NFL championship game.

Orlando Pace, Sandusky (Ohio), 1993
Resume:
Pace was bigger than most professional offensive linemen when he was still in high school. At 6-foot-8, 320 pounds, Pace was the state lineman of the year as a senior while also earning All-America honors. He became one of just two Buckeyes to ever start as a true freshmen. He is the only two-time winner of the Lombardi Award, winning it as a 20-year old sophomore. He's in the NFL and College Halls of Fame.
Why would he be drafted: Size alone would have made Pace a tempting pick. He's one of the largest players ever selected to the Hall of Fame. However, he was also characterized as being very athletic for a player his size. It was those attributes that made him the No. 1 overall pick in the 1997 NFL Draft.

Bill Fralic, Penn Hills (Pittsburgh, Pa.), 1980
Resume:
A four-year starter at Penn Hills, Fralic helped his team win three WPIAL championships. As a senior, he earned the Dial National Athlete of the Year Award, which had been given the previous year to Herschel Walker. A two-way lineman, Fralic had 15 sacks as a senior, but he found his way into the starting lineup at Pittsburgh as a college freshman. He eventually earned consensus All-America honors twice and was twice a top 10 finisher in the Heisman Trophy voting. He was a four-time Pro Bowl player in the NFL with the Falcons.
Why would he be drafted: Fralic's versatility would have been a huge bonus as he was able to play on both the offensive and defensive lines as well as tight end. He dominated high school opponents with his quickness and strength.

Bronko Nagurski, Bemidji (Minn.), 1926
Resume:
More legendary stories have been told about Nagurski than probably any NFL player in history. Noted for his incredible strength, speed and agility, Nagurski was a powerful runner on offense, but also strong enough to play offensive tackle. He ran the 100-yard dash in 10.2 seconds and reportedly had a 19.5 inch ring size — the largest of any NFL Hall of Fame member. He reportedly could have played any position on the field during the 1930s, including quarterback. He threw several touchdown passes in leading the Bears to two world championships.
Why would he be drafted: At 6-2, 220 pounds, Nagurski was bigger than over half of the linemen on the Chicago Bears when he joined them. His natural strength made him such a valuable player at the University of Minnesota and later with the Bears.
High school football: Historic win moves Norco to No. 10 in HIGHSCORE Top 25 California rankings - HIGHSCORE
High school football: Historic win moves Norco to No. 10 in MaxPreps Top 25 California rankings
In recent memory, some things just don't happen in Southern Section football.

1. Mater Dei (Santa Ana) and St. John Bosco (Bellflower) don't get threatened — unless they play each other.

2. Centennial (Corona) doesn't lose — unless it's to Mater Dei or Bosco.

3. Teams don't enter the MaxPreps Top 25 rankings in the Top 10.

All those "never-happens" happened last week.  

CALIFORNIA SPRING COMPUTER RANKINGS: Compare to human rankings below

• For the second straight game, No. 4 Servite (Anaheim) gave one of the two national juggernauts a heck of a game, losing 24-17 to No. 1 Mater Dei. The Monarchs needed a pick-six from junior cornerback Cameron Sidney and a strip-sack on the game's final play to eek out the win. The previous week, Servite (2-2) played toe-to-toe with No. 2 Bosco, losing 38-28.

• Previous No. 3 Centennial was stunned by unranked Norco 38-36, ending the Huskies' 57-game Big VIII league win streak. Junior quarterback Kyle Crum accounted for 265 yards and three touchdowns leading the Cougars to their first win over perennial national power Centennial since 2009.

• With the victory, Norco (3-0), which outscored its first two opponents by a cumulative score of 116-12, jumped from unranked to No. 10, just ahead of the Huskies and behind No. 9 Cathedral Catholic (San Diego).

Speaking of, Cathedral Catholic (3-0) hosts No. 22 Lincoln (San Diego) on Friday in the state Game of the Week that will decide the supremacy of the San Diego Section. Cathedral Catholic is coming off a bye while Lincoln won its third straight blowout, 52-0 over Madison (San Diego), giving the Hornets a 152-0 season edge over all opponents.
Cathedral Catholic junior running back Lucky Sutton leads the team with 463 rushing yards and four touchdowns. Ninth-ranked Cathedral Catholic hosts No. 22 Lincoln on Friday.
File photo by Michael Cazares
Cathedral Catholic junior running back Lucky Sutton leads the team with 463 rushing yards and four touchdowns. Ninth-ranked Cathedral Catholic hosts No. 22 Lincoln on Friday.
MaxPreps Top 25 California Football Rankings

1. Mater Dei (Santa Ana)
Record: 3-0 | Last week: 1
Result: Beat Servite, 24-17
Next game: Friday vs. Santa Margarita at Santa Ana Stadium

2. St. John Bosco (Bellflower)
Record: 4-0 | Last week: 2
Result: Beat JSerra, 66-14
Next game: Saturday vs. Orange Lutheran

3. De La Salle (Concord)
Record: 4-0 | Last week: 4
Result: Beat Jesuit (Carmichael), 42-7
Next game: Saturday at California (San Ramon)

4. Servite (Anaheim)
Record: 2-2 | Last week: 5
Result: Lost to Mater Dei, 24-17
Next game: Friday at JSerra

5. Sierra Canyon (Chatsworth)
Record: 3-1 | Last week: 6
Result: Beat Garces (Bakersfield), 42-0
Next game: Friday at Upland

6. Mission Viejo
Record: 3-0 | Last week: 7
Result: Beat Tesoro, 44-13
Next game: Friday vs. San Juan Hills

7. Los Alamitos
Record: 4-0 | Last week: 9
Result: Beat Huntington Beach, 63-14
Next game: Thursday vs. Fountain Valley at Huntington Beach

8. Alemany (Mission Hills)
Record: 3-0 | Last week: 8
Result: Beat Cathedral (Los Angeles), 21-7
Next game: Saturday at Chaminade

9. Cathedral Catholic (San Diego)
Record: 3-0 | Last week: 17
Result: Idle
Next game: Friday vs. Lincoln (San Diego)

10. Norco
Record: 3-0 | Last week: NR
Result: Beat Centennial (Corona), 38-36
Next game: Thursday vs. King (Riverside)

11. Centennial (Corona)
Record: 2-1 | Last week: 3
Result: Lost to Norco, 38-36
Next game: Thursday vs. Roosevelt (Eastvale)

12. Long Beach Poly
Record: 3-0 | Last week: 11
Result: Beat Compton, 45-0
Next game: April 16 vs. Milliken (Long Beach)

13. Folsom
Record: 4-0 | Last week: 12
Result: Beat Whitney (Rocklin), 40-7
Next game: Friday vs. Rocklin

14. Santa Margarita (Rancho Santa Margarita)
Record: 2-1 | Last week: 13
Result: Idle
Next game: Friday vs. Mater Dei at Santa Ana Bowl

15. Loyola (Los Angeles)
Record: 2-0 | Last week: 15
Result: Beat St. Francis (La Canada), 41-14
Next game: Friday at St. Paul

16. Serra (San Mateo)
Record: 3-0 | Last week: 16
Result: Beat St. Francis (Mountain View), 49-7
Next game: Saturday at Riordan (San Francisco)

17. Oaks Christian (Westlake Village)
Record:
3-1 | Last week: 17
Result: Beat Upland, 27-16
Next game: Saturday at Calabasas

18. San Clemente

Record: 3-0 | Last week: 18
Result: Beat San Juan Hills (San Juan Capistrano), 35-7
Next game: Friday at Tesoro (Rancho Santa Margarita) 

19. Buchanan (Clovis)
Record: 3-0 | Last week: 19
Result: Beat Clovis, 45-38
Next game: Friday vs. Clovis North

20. Rancho Verde (Moreno Valley)
Record: 3-0 | Last week: 20
Result: Beat Elsinore, 56-2
Next game: Thursday vs. San Jacinto

21. Carlsbad
Record: 3-0 | Last week: 21
Result: Beat Oceanside, 30-12
Next game: Friday vs. La Costa Canyon

22. Lincoln (San Diego)
Record: 3-0 | Last week: 22
Result: Beat Madison (San Diego), 52-0
Next game: Friday at Cathedral Catholic (San Diego)

23. Serra (Gardena)
Record: 3-1 | Last week: 23
Result: Beat Notre Dame (Sherman Oaks), 29-14
Next game: Friday at Bishop Amat

24. Edison (Huntington Beach)
Record: 3-1 | Last week: 24
Result: Beat Fountain Valley, 40-0
Next game: Friday vs. Corona del Mar at Huntington Beach

25. La Habra
Record: 4-0 | Last week: NR
Result: Beat Buena Park, 62-0
Next game: Friday at Troy

Dropped out: Bishop Amat (La Puente), Pacifica (Oxnard)

MaxPreps National Football editor Zack Poff contributed to this report.
High school football: La Salle's schedule release includes games against national power IMG Academy - HIGHSCORE
High school football: La Salle's schedule release includes games against national power IMG Academy
The National Football League is set to release its 2021 schedule Wednesday and were about 100 days from the start of the high school football fall season. Some teams, like La Salle (Cincinnati), are taking a cue from the NFL and releasing their schedule.

The Lancers play in the Greater Catholic League-South, one of the toughest in Ohio, and also face a difficult non-league schedule headlined by a showdown against 2020 MaxPreps National Champion, IMG Academy (Bradenton, Fla.).

"We want our kids to play the best teams. So, here we go," La Salle head coach Pat McLaughlin said.

McLaughlin and the Lancers face three teams ranked in the final MaxPreps Top 25. La Salle hosts the Ascenders on Sept. 3 at Lancer Stadium. IMG went wire-to-wire as the No. 1 team in the country last fall.

The Lancers travel to Kentucky to face Trinity (Louisville) on Sept. 10. The Shamrocks won their eighth state title since 2010 and finished 10th nationally last fall, going 10-0 while outscoring the opposition 429-48.

Three weeks later, on Oct. 1, La Salle hosts Indiana 5A champion Cathedral (Indianapolis). The Fighting Irish finished at No. 19 in the MaxPreps Top 25 after going 13-1.

La Salle was 8-3 last season, falling 14-10 to Washington (Massillon) in the Ohio Division II semifinals. The Lancers won a state title in 2019, their fourth since 2014. The 2021 schedule they've compiled should prepare the Lancers for all-comers in the postseason.

MaxPreps starts releasing its preseason high school football content with the preseason MaxPreps Top 25 on June 23. Expect to see the Lancers featured in our Top 10 toughest schedules dropping later in July.
La Salle coach Pat McLaughlin, seen in 2019, has a tough schedule prepared for the Lancers this season, facing reigning MaxPreps National Champion IMG Academy as well as Trinity and Cathedral.
File photo by Jeff Harwell
La Salle coach Pat McLaughlin, seen in 2019, has a tough schedule prepared for the Lancers this season, facing reigning MaxPreps National Champion IMG Academy as well as Trinity and Cathedral.
2021 La Salle football schedule

Aug. 20 — vs. Colerain (Cincinnati)

Aug. 27 — vs. Winton Woods (Cincinnati)

Sept. 3 — vs. IMG Academy (Bradenton, Fla.)

Sept. 10 — at Trinity (Louisville)

Sept. 17 — vs. DuPont Manual (Louisville)

*Sept. 24 — at Archbishop Moeller (Cincinnati)

Oct. 1 — vs. Cathedral (Indianapolis)

*Oct. 8 — at St. Xavier (Cincinnati)

Oct. 15 — at Trotwood-Madison (Trotwood)

*Oct. 22 — vs. Elder (Cincinnati)

*Indicates league game
Viane Cumber named 2020-21 HIGHSCORE New Mexico High School Girls Basketball Player of the Year - HIGHSCORE
Viane Cumber named 2020-21 MaxPreps New Mexico High School Girls Basketball Player of the Year
Each year since 2006, MaxPreps has recognized outstanding performers in high school basketball. America's source for high school sports continues the tradition to close out the 2020-21 season by naming the top player in each state. Selections are based on team success and individual excellence, in addition to local and state accolades.

Viane Cumber of Sandia (Albuquerque) is the 2020-21 MaxPreps New Mexico High School Girls Basketball Player of the Year. The 5-foot-10 senior guard led the Matadors to a 7-4 record during a shortened season due to the pandemic.

The University of New Mexico signee averaged 26.5 points, 9.3 rebounds, 2.2 assists and 1.5 steals per game. Cumber shot 52 percent from the field and 70 percent at the foul line.

In three seasons and 61 games, Cumber averaged 21.2 points, 8.9 rebounds, 2.5 steals and 2.3 assists and 2.5 steals. She led the Matadors to 40 combined wins as a sophomore and junior.

New Mexico head coach Mike Bradbury said he was "elated" when Cumber signed with the Lobos: "She brings versatility and size to the guard spot and her ability to score is tremendous," he said. "Her character and work ethic is also a huge asset."
New Mexico Player of the Year Viane Cumber will be staying close to home and playing for the Lobos next season.
Photo by Jim Smith
New Mexico Player of the Year Viane Cumber will be staying close to home and playing for the Lobos next season.