Watch News High School Sport Today - HIGHSCORE


High school baseball: No-hit king Nolan Ryan among pitchers with at least 500 career strikeouts - HIGHSCORE
High school baseball: No-hit king Nolan Ryan among pitchers with at least 500 career strikeouts
David Clyde of Westchester (Houston) was a high school legend in the early 1970s and his resume includes a multitude of records in the National Federation of High Schools record book, including the mark for career strikeouts with 842. Except that depending on how you determine career strikeouts, Clyde is not Nos. 1 or 2 or even third or fourth.

In fact Clyde comes in behind Mississippi hurler Ronnie Richardson, a pair of Iowa pitchers in Bill Varner and Mike Boddicker, and Oklahoma leader Mark Turner. They are among the pitchers featured in the MaxPreps list of pitchers with over 500 career strikeouts.

To be fair, Clyde does hold the record for a four-year career, which is what the National Federation of High Schools recognizes. However, if a fifth year is included, Richardson moves into the top spot with 856 strikeouts.

Then, if you include pitchers from the schools in Iowa and Oklahoma that play both a summer and fall season (and in some cases a spring and summer season), then you have to include Varner, Turner and Boddicker.

Under these circumstances, Varner set the national record with 1,042 strikeouts in his four years at Decorah, graduating in 1970. He played three spring seasons to go with four summer seasons. Turner had 917 strikeouts in three fall and four spring seasons for Vanoss in Oklahoma from 1989-92.

Boddicker topped Varner for the all-time lead in Iowa, and the nation, with 1,122 strikeouts from 1972-75 while at Norway. Boddicker played three fall seasons to go with four spring seasons. The MLB All-Star also holds the record for most all-time wins with 79 (with all seasons considered). Boddicker went on to earn American League Conference Series MVP honors in 1983 en route to helping the Baltimore Orioles win the World Series.

Clyde also played professionally after being selected by the Texas Rangers with the first overall pick in 1973. Twenty days after pitching his final high school game, Clyde started for the Rangers and won his first MLB outing. Injuries marred his career, however, and he finished with 18 wins and 33 losses.

The first player to record 500 career strikeouts during a spring-only career is believed to be Francis Vidrine, who had exactly 500 while at Seligman (Ariz.) from 1955 to 1958. None other than MLB all-time strikeout leader Nolan Ryan of Alvin (Texas) became the all-time leader in 1965 with 510 strikeouts. Future California Angels teammate Lloyd Allen of Selma (Calif.) topped Ryan with 588 strikeouts upon graduation in 1968. Gene Carfrey of Westfall (Williamsport, Ohio) raised the record to 649 strikeouts in 1969 and then Clyde raised it to 842 in 1973. Richardson has held the spring record ever since 1987.

Another Mississippi pitcher, Randolph Salters of Mooreville, might have broken Clyde's records in the mid-1980s, but his career numbers are unavailable. According to former coach Rex Berryman, in an e-mail to MaxPreps, all of his records and scorebooks were inadvertently destroyed by contractors when Mooreville moved from the old gym to the new gym in 1988.

Salters holds the national record for single season strikeouts, although that total is up for dispute. Three different stories by the Clarion Ledger list Salters with 344 strikeouts, 366 strikeouts and 381 strikeouts during a 25-4 season. The 381 total is the most likely total since the Clarion Ledger ran a story about Salters on May 23, 1985, listing him with 366 and he then pitched in the championship game on May 25, striking out 15.

Salters struck out somewhere in the neighborhood of 140 batters as a junior, but exact totals are unavailable. His sophomore and freshman season are also unknown and he finished his career with a record of 53-9.

With new rules restricting the amount of batters a pitcher can face in a week (Salters once pitched 27 innings in four days in the state tournament), it's unlikely anyone will top the totals amassed by Clyde, Richardson, Varner, Turner and Boddicker. The most recent addition to the list is Bubba Gomez of Fremont Christian (Fremont, Calif.), who had 569 strikeouts between 2016 and 2019. That's still nearly 300 strikeouts away from the spring record.

Sources for the list include the NFHS record book, state association record books, coaches association record books, Iwasatthegame.com, Mississippi Baseball Record Book by John Smillie, and the Cal-Hi Sports Record by Mark and Nelson Tennis.
Bubba Gomez, Fremont Christian
File photo by Jim Malone
Bubba Gomez, Fremont Christian
Pitchers with 500 or more career strikeouts (spring only)

1.   856 — Ronnie Richardson, Lee (Columbus, Miss.), now Columbus (Miss.), 1983-87
2.   842 — David Clyde, Westchester (Houston), now closed, 1970-73
3.   734 — Jerry Boldt, Woodlawn (Chicago), 1979-83
4.   729 — Allen Rath, Highland (Riverside, Iowa), 1983-86
5.   690 — Brad Howard, Oakdale (Tenn.), 1992-96
6.   680 — Kelly Owens, Junction City (Ark.), 1979-82
7.   662 — Jordan Ray, Hillcrest (Tuscaloosa, Ala.), 2005-08
8.   661 — Steve Fink, Kee (Lansing, Iowa), 1970-73
9.   658 — Jaime Sepeda, Sinton (Texas), 1986-89
10. 651 — Tyler Stovall, Hokes Bluff (Ala.), 2005-08

10. 651 — Paul Morse, Danville (Ky.), 1988-92
12. 649 — Gene Carfrey, Westfall (Williamsport, Ohio), 1966-69
13. 646 — Craig Van Hulzen, Apple Valley Christian (Apple Valley, Calif.), 1987-90
14. 644 — David Flattery, St. Edmond (Fort Dodge, Iowa), 1974-77
15. 640 — David Mabe, East Surry (Pilot Mountain, N.C.), 1981-84
16. 637 — Pat Underwood, Kokomo (Ind.), 1971-74
17. 626 — Brian DuBois, Reed-Custer (Braidwood, Ill.), 1982-85
18. 623 — Mike Wisniewski, Bangor (Mich.), 1991-94
19. 612 — Tyler Sander, Okoboji (Milford, Iowa), 2000-03
19. 612 — Jon Peters, Brenham (Texas), 1986-89

21. 606 — Todd Neibel, Waltonville (Ill.), 1980-83
21. 606 — Bert Neff, Mooresville (Ind.), 1990-93
23. 598 — Will Inman, Tunstall (Dry Fork, Va.), 2002-05
23. 598 — Manuel Mendez, Washington Union (Fresno, Calif.), 1990-92
25. 597 — Matt Tomso, Mt. Olive (Ill.), 1987-90
26. 593 — Steve DeRoos, Wheeler (Valparaiso, Ind.), 1984-87
27. 590 — Gunner Baker, Carlisle (Price, Texas), 2010-13
28. 589 — Larry Knight, Lookout Valley (Chattanooga, Tenn.), 1978-80
29. 588 — Lloyd Allen, Selma (Calif.), 1965-68
30. 587 — Schuyler Tripp, Davis County (Bloomfield, Iowa), 2002-05

31. 586 — Mike Mercer, Nishna Valley (Hastings, Iowa), 1980-84
32. 585 — Cody Reed, Ardmore (Ala.), 2011-14
33. 583 — Nate Wernette, Morley Stanwood (Morley, Mich.), 2000-03
34. 580 — Brennen Milby, Green County (Greensburg, Ky.), 2008-13
35. 578 — Ron Robinson, Woodlake (Calif.), 1977-80
36. 575 — Ryno Bethel, Willcox (Ariz.), 1998-2001
37. 572 — David Dinsmore, Reese (Mich.), 2000-03
38. 569 — Bubba Gomez, Fremont Christian (Fremont, Calif.), 2016-19
39. 568 — John Tolson, Decatur Central (Indianapolis), 1998-2001
40. 566 — TJ Prunty, St. Paul Academy (Minn.), 1996-2000

40. 566 — Bob Goodyear, Lutheran (Los Angeles, Calif.), 1971-73
42. 564 — Jake Forrester, Umpqua Valley Christian (Roseburg, Ore.), 2011-14
43. 555 — Todd Malone, Casa Roble (Orangevale, Calif.), 1986-88
44. 553 — Tom Underwood, Kokomo (Ind.), 1969-72
44. 553 — Kevin Waldrum, Millsap (Texas), 1996-97
44. 553 — Steve Streater, Sylva-Webster (N.C.), now Smoky Mountain (Sylva, N.C.) 1974-77
47. 552 — Will Jostock, Lapeer West (Lapeer, Mich.), 2001-04
48. 551 — Ben Van Ryn, East Noble (Kendallville, Ind.), 1987-90
49. 550 — RA Dickey, Montgomery Bell Academy (Nashville, Tenn.), 1990-93
50. 548 — Alec Carney, Webster Christian (Webster, N.Y.), 2002-06

50. 548 — Gregg Johnson, Moorehead (East Monona, Iowa), now West Harrison (Mondamin, Iowa) 1983-85
52. 547 — Richy Harrelson, Iuka (Miss.), now Tishomingo County (Iuka, Miss.), 1988-92
53. 546 — Josh Collmenter, Homer (Mich.), 2001-04
54. 545 — Nick Stiles, Bath (Mich.), 2009-12
55. 542 — Able D'Loera, Grant (Oklahoma City, Okla.), 1998-2001
56. 541 — Del Howell, American Christian Academy (Tuscaloosa, Ala.), 2002-06
56. 541 — Chris Schoon, Anamosa (Iowa), 1974-77
58. 540 — Jerome Hammontree, Sperry (Okla.), 1987-90
59. 535 — Ryan Keaffaber, Northfield (Wabash, Ind.), 2010-13
59. 535 — Thomas Mitchell, Bladenboro (N.C.), 1997-2000

61. 531 — Sam Traver, Potterville (Mich.), 2012-15
61. 531 — Bob Rossi, Corning West (N.Y.), 1969-72
63. 528 — Drew Henson, Brighton (Mich.), 1995-98
64. 526 — Jeff Granger, Orangefield (Texas), 1987-90
65. 525 — Mike Taylor, Iowa Falls (Iowa), 1973-76
65. 525 — Logan Ehlers, Nebraska City (Neb.), 2007-10
67. 524 — Guy Finch, Clarksville (Ind.), 1975-78
68. 523 — Keith Creel, Duncanville (Texas), 1974-77
68. 523 — Kirk Benda, Decorah-North Winneshiek (Decorah, Iowa), 1980-81
70. 521 — Aron Cornett, Concord (Ark.), 2002-04

70. 521 — Ty Henderson, Webber (Bluford, Ill.), 2010-13
70. 521 — Steven Rice, Crawfordsville (Ind.), 2007-10
73. 520 — Brian Bohanon, North Shore (Houston), 1984-87
74. 519 — Drew Tanner, Coffee (Douglas, Ga.), 1979-82
74. 519 — Justin Willoughby, Princeton (N.C.), 1993-96
76. 518 — Ryan Ellison, Isabella (Maplesville, Ala.), 2000-04
76. 518 — Lesley Piersall, Hutsonville (Ill.), 1995-98
76. 518 — Tom King, La Porte (Ind.), 1970-72
79. 517 — Tyler Howe, Northeast (Goose Lake, Iowa), 2000-04
80. 515 — Doug Bates, J.J. Kelly (Va.), 1980-83

81. 513 — Tony Watson, Dallas Center-Grimes (Dallas Center, Iowa), 2000-03
82. 512 — Chandler Shepherd, Lawrence County (Louisa, Ky.), 2006-11
82. 512 — Joe Goodman, Gilbert (Iowa), 2008-11
84. 511 — Scott Davidson, Redondo Union (Redondo Beach, Calif.), 1986-88
85. 510 — Jim Peterson, Sonora (La Habra, Calif.), 1971-73
85. 510 — Brian Barnes, Roanoke Rapids (N.C.), 1982-85
85. 510 — Kevin Mann, Jackson Center (Ohio), 2003-06
85. 510 — Nolan Ryan, Alvin (Texas), 1963-65
89. 506 — Jon Kirby, Estill County (Irvine, Ky.), 1999-2002
90. 505 — Tim Rogers, Bixby (Okla.), 1975-78

91. 502 — Chad Billingsley, Defiance (Ohio), 2000-03
92. 501 — Chase Reeves, Hamilton (Miss.), 2007-11
93. 500 — Francis Vidrine, Seligman (Ariz.), 1955-58
93. 500 — Harvey Marshall, Floyd County (Floyd, Va.), 1975-79

Top 10 Fall-Spring-Summer combo strikeout leaders
1. 1,122 — Mike Boddicker, Norway (Iowa), 1972-75
2. 1,042 — Bill Varner, Decorah (Iowa), 1967-70
3.    917 — Mark Turner, Vanoss (Ada, Okla.), 1989-92
4.    817 — Will Hunt, Asher (Okla.), 1986-89
5.    757 — Mario Enriquez, Davidson (Okla.), 1986-89
6.    743 — Cal Eldred, Urbana (Iowa), 1983-86
7.    735 — Brett Case, Preston (Okla.), 2000-03
8.    732 — Larry Frakes, Goldfield (Iowa), 1968-72
9.    723 — Kevin Lomon, Cameron (Okla.), 1987-90
10.  687 — Cale Elam, Oktaha (Okla.), 2006-10
Note: It's possible Boddicker and Varner would qualify for the "spring only" list, but their spring-only totals are unknown.
Poll: Who was better as a prep, Clayton Kershaw or Madison Bumgarner? - HIGHSCORE
Poll: Who was better as a prep, Clayton Kershaw or Madison Bumgarner?
Graphic by Social Recluse Graphx
Many baseball fans will tune in to tonight's Dodgers vs. Giants game because, well, it's the Dodgers and Giants. It's one of the game's great rivalries - and one of the bes in all of sports.

What makes this late-April tilt so big is the pitchers: reigning two-time Cy Young Award winner and league MVP Clayton Kershaw vs. reigning World Series MVP Madison Bumgarner.

It is the first time in MLB history the reigning league and World Series MVPs have met on the mound.

So, we at MaxPreps — a place (relatively) divided between Giants and Dodgers fans — present the million-dollar question: Who was a better prep player, Kershaw or Bumgarner?

As a senior at Highland Park (Dallas) in 2006, Kershaw posted a 13-0 record with a 0.77 ERA and 139 strikeouts in 64 innings. He pitched a perfect game, striking out all 15 batters in a playoff win shortened due to the mercy rule. He was the Gatorade National Player of the Year his senior year.

Bumgarner was 23-4 over his last two seasons for South Caldwell (Hudson, N.C.), leading his team to state 4A title games both years and winning in 2007. He had a 1.00 ERA and struck out 263 in 170 innings in that span and capped his prep career with a walk-off two-run homer to win the state title. He hit .424 with 11 home runs and 38 RBIs in those two seasons and was the Gatorade North Carolina Player of the Year his senior year.

OK fans, please vote below for who was a better as a prep. A friendly lunch wager is on the line.
Clayton Kershaw, Los Angeles Dodgers
Getty images
Clayton Kershaw, Los Angeles Dodgers



What will high school football look like in the fall? - HIGHSCORE
What will high school football look like in the fall?
North Carolina and Rhode Island conclude the highly unusual 2020-21 high school football season with championships this weekend. Once those states are a wrap, attention will shift to the fall with plenty of questions and speculation about what exactly that will look like across the country.

Without another major surge in COVID-19 numbers, prep football in the fall should look all but identical to pre-2020 according to most state associations and federations. How many fans will be in attendance is still very much up in the air.

"Assuming everything continues as is, we plan a full and regular school year of education-based athletics in 2021-22, including football," California Interscholastic Federation Executive Director Ron Nocetti said. "We'll know more about fan allowance as we get closer to our start dates."

A good number of states already — 35 of the 50 — powered through with football last fall (Vermont played touch and not tackle) and all but four of those states held state championships. Alaska, Minnesota, West Virginia and Wisconsin stopped short of championship games due to the pandemic.

To get to the fall finish line took much resolve. That may have been exemplified best by Michigan, which first moved football to the spring, then back to the fall only to delay the season 42 days starting in November due to surging COVID-19 numbers. The state eventually crowned 10 champions by Jan. 23.

The states that completed fall seasons are ready and eager to go, just tweaking pandemic protocols which will likely be loosened significantly from 2020.

"Hopefully we're getting closer and closer to normal as possible," De La Salle (Concord, Calif.) coach Justin Alumbaugh said. "We'd be naive to think it's going back completely to old times. We still need to address locker room issues. And testing needs to be more streamlined and easier. There surely is a lot more administrative work on coaches than there used to be."

California is one of the 11 states that played its 2020 season in the spring of 2021. Of those states, only three played for state titles. All spring teams have trickier off-seasons than normal with summer conditioning only a few weeks away.

Of the four states that didn't play a down of tackle football in 2020-21, Hawaii is the only one to hold spring scrimmages, including one last week between perennial state powers St. Louis (Honolulu) and Punahou (Honolulu). It took three days for St. Louis to complete 150 COVID-19 tests, all which came back negative, according to its coach. 

"We got to see all the young guys play and seniors got to play and wrap up their year," St. Louis coach Ron Lee told Paul Honda of Hawaii Prep World. "Kids are so happy we had this. I feel sorry for other schools that didn't have what we did, being out there with their friends. They were having fun. They've learned how to handle disappointment."

St. Louis will meet Kamehameha Kapalama (Honolulu) this week in another scrimmage, which indicates a green light for an Aug. 6 start date for the fall season. That would put Hawaii in the leadoff spot, like normal, for the 2021 fall season.

Utah took those reins last season, kicking off the 2020 season on Aug. 13. The season went largely unscathed, finishing off with five state championship games in late November. With its entire schedule planned for 2021, including another Aug. 13 opening, Utah once again has its foot firmly on the floor board.
Crimson Cliffs helped Utah kick off the 2020 season with an opening game against Manti.
File photo by Adam Cartwright
Crimson Cliffs helped Utah kick off the 2020 season with an opening game against Manti.
Like many states, Utah is seeing significant realignment, including the re-addition of 1A football, giving it six classifications. It's also seeing a larger-than-normal turnover at the top with 16 new head coaches in the state, according to the Utah Desert News.

That national trend is likely residue of burnout from navigating through the pandemic, coaches say.

"It seems like (2020) never really started or really ended," said Alumbaugh, whose six-game season ended April 17.

Said Nocetti: "So much more is being put on the plate of these coaches. I would hope that communities would be even more supportive and appreciative of high school coaches during this time. They need it. That's the only way they will continue to stay longer."

The passion for football is never going away in Texas.

Spring football is back in the Lone Star State after being canceled in 2020. The University Interscholastic League allows 18 spring training practices over 34 days, giving teams the opportunity for scrimmages or even a spring game. Programs still must follow the UIL's own risk mitigation guidelines, but things may be loosening in areas concerning specific mask mandates and dressing room policies.

Some of the larger schools, which had regular seasons moved back a month, moved back their spring workouts. Others, like defending Class 5A-I champion Ryan (Denton), opted out of spring ball completely. All of that points to the fall season starting right on time and looking back to normal.

On Wednesday, the UIL also sent a release that summer marching band and strength and conditioning activities may begin immediately following the end of the 2020-21 school year.
Westlake quarterback Cade Klubnik will help his team defend a Texas 6A-I championship in 2021.
File photo by Sean Roach
Westlake quarterback Cade Klubnik will help his team defend a Texas 6A-I championship in 2021.
Other state updates:

* Georgia started with a few hiccups to start 2020, but primarily proceeded as normal. The 2021 season is aligned as previous years: Teams are allowed one spring and one fall scrimmage (or two in the fall), acclimation period begins July 26 and first day of practice in pads is Aug. 2, first games are Aug. 20 and playoffs begin Nov. 12.

* In Florida, beyond massive new districts, regions and reclassifications for 2021, the state's football season should look much like 2019 and prior. The playoff system returns to district play for teams in Class 5A through 8A.

* In Tennessee, the TSSAA board voted to allow summer team camps and the return of 7-on-7 football, as long as COVID-19 protocols are in place. Those activities had been suspended since the pandemic began. The state's high school sports governing body also changed its state championship venue for two seasons to Chattanooga's Finley Stadium, which seats 22,000, Concerns over locker room space and use — with so many games — were addressed and dismissed.

* In Ohio, a positive was gleaned from adjustments to the pandemic — increasing its playoff format. Last fall, the OHSAA allowed every team to enter the playoffs due to the shortened season. It was met with overwhelmingly positive feedback, according to OHSAA executive director Doug Ute. Thus it expanded its playoff qualifiers in 2021, from pre-2020 season, to 16 schools per region.
2020 HIGHSCORE High School Football Junior All-America Team - HIGHSCORE
2020 MaxPreps High School Football Junior All-America Team
Each year since 2006, MaxPreps has recognized the nation's top high school football players. Past members of the MaxPreps Junior All-America Team include Jadeveon Clowney (2009), Jameis Winston (2010), Derrick Henry (2011), Deshaun Watson (2012), Kyler Murray (2013), Nick Bosa (2014), Najee Harris (2015), Trevor Lawrence (2016), Kayvon Thibodeaux (2017) and D.J. Uiagalelei (2018).

National Junior of the Year selection Travis Hunter of Collins Hill (Suwanee, Ga.) headlines the 2020 MaxPreps High School Football Junior All-America Team. The five-star Florida State commit finished had with 137 receptions for 1,746 yards and 24 touchdowns for the Eagles while recording 51 tackles and eight interceptions on defense.

He led Collins Hill to its first state title game appearance and is a rare athlete who could be a five-star recruit either at cornerback or wide receiver.

Selections are based on team success, individual production and local, regional state honors from the recently completed season. Potential at the college and professional level is not a primary consideration.
Graphic by Ryan Escobar
First Team Offense

Height: 6-2 | Weight: 180
Led the Chaps to a 6A Division 1 state title and No. 3 spot in the final MaxPreps Top 25 rankings. Accounted for over 4,000 yards of total offense (3,495 passing, 583 rushing) and 50 touchdowns.

Height: 5-9 | Weight: 170
MaxPreps Oklahoma Player of the Year rushed for 1,744 yards and 25 touchdowns for the three-time defending 6A-II champs. Added 57 receptions for 727 yards and 10 scores.

Height: 5-11 | Weight: 205
Rushed for 2,155 yards and 30 touchdowns in 11 games.

Height: 6-2 | Weight: 195
Oklahoma commit was selected on the Class 3A first team by the Missouri Football Coaches Association.

Height: 5-8 | Weight: 170
Led largest classification in Alabama with 18 total touchdowns and racked up more than 1,600 total yards for the No. 6 team in the country.

Height: 6-5 | Weight: 210
The top-rated tight end in his class on 247Sports composite rankings had nearly 1,000 yards receiving and 10 touchdowns for the AAA runners-up.

Height: 6-4 | Weight: 315
Dominated opposing lineman playing against the best competition.

Height: 6-4 | Weight: 265
The top-rated offensive lineman from Texas in his class dominated this season.

Height: 6-6 | Weight: 285
Has landed over 35 FBS offers and excels in pass and run blocking.

Height: 6-6 | Weight: 300
Helped Explorers to an 8-0 record and 8A Tri-County championship in 2020, a season after helping St. Thomas Aquinas (Fort Lauderdale, Fla.) to a 7A state title as a sophomore.

Height: 6-6 | Weight: 315
Clemson commit did not allow a sack during his junior year.

Height: 6-1 | Weight: 165
Junior Player of the Year hauled in 137 receptions for 1,746 yards and 24 touchdowns while recording 51 tackles and eight interceptions on defense.

Height: 5-10 | Weight: 145
One of the strongest legs in the country already has offers from Florida, LSU and Tennessee.

First Team Defense

DL Jeremiah Alexander, Thompson (Alabaster, Ala.)
Height: 6-2 | Weight: 235
Former Alabama pledge racked up 116 tackles, 31 tackles for loss and nine sacks for the back-to-back 7A champs.

Height: 6-4 | Weight: 225
Played a major role on defense for the 5A state champs, finishing with a team-high 15.5 sacks.
Height: 6-5 | Weight: 255
Four-star defensive tackle had 17 sacks and 19 tackles for loss in 2020.

Height: 6-4 | Weight: 240
Has been a standout on the defensive line for the last two years playing against the state's best competition.

Height: 6-3 | Weight: 230
Oklahoma commit was a monster during his junior year and has some of the game's most impressive tape.

Height: 6-1 | Weight: 195
Does it all at a high level from the linebacker position. Helped the Rockets to a Top 25 finish and back-to-back 6A championships.

Height: 6-2 | Weight: 200
One of the most underrated prospects finished with 140 tackles, 10 tackles for loss, five sacks and three interceptions for the ninth-ranked team in the country.

Height: 6-1 | Weight: 180
As good as any defensive back in the country, regardless of class.

Height: 6-1 | Weight: 170
Recent Ohio State commit made a big-time impact on both sides of the ball.

DB Kamari Wilson, IMG Academy (Bradenton, Fla.)
Height: 6-1 | Weight: 195
Ascenders went wire-to-wire as the No. 1 team in the country and Wilson stood out on defense every week.

Height: 6-2 | Weight: 190
Bounced back in 2020 and shutdown opposing wide receivers all year after missing sophomore campaign with a torn ACL.

Height: 6-0 | Weight: 180
Five-star recruit hauled in 52 receptions for 902 yards and 10 touchdowns while recording four interceptions on defense.

Height: 5-11 | Weight: 170
Finished eighth in the nation averaging 45.2 yards per punt and also connected on 10-of-15 field goals.

Second Team Offense

Height: 6-3 | Weight: 195
Top-rated 2022 prospect led the Dragons to first state title game appearance since 2011. Finished with 2,442 yards passing and 28 touchdowns in eight games.

Height: 5-11 | Weight: 195
MaxPreps Tennessee Player of the Year rushed for 2,010 yards and 24 touchdowns in nine games.

Height: 5-9 | Weight: 175
MaxPreps Arkansas Player of the Year put up video game numbers for the 5A champs. Rushed for 1,925 yards and 23 touchdowns averaging 10.2 yards per carry to go with 80 receptions for 1,068 yards and nine scores.

WR Cody Hagen, Corner Canyon (Draper, Utah)
Height: 6-1 | Weight: 175
Three-star wide receiver had a touchdown in all 14 games this year and finished with 55 receptions for 1,184 yards and 18 scores for the 6A champs.

Height: 6-3 | Weight: 185
Oklahoma commit hauled in 61 receptions for 1,152 yards and 14 touchdowns for the runner-up in 6A-I. 

TE RJ Maryland, Southlake Carroll (Southlake, Texas)
Height: 6-4 | Weight: 210
Had nearly 800 yards receiving and 13 touchdowns averaging over 24 yards per catch for the No. 15 team in the nation.

Height: 6-5 | Weight: 295
Clemson commit is one of the most physical and athletic offensive lineman in the game.

Height: 6-4 | Weight: 315
Eagles have had some great offensive lineman come through their program and Dewberry continues that legacy.

Height: 6-5 | Weight: 255
Dominated on both sides of the ball. He's also a standout pitcher in baseball.

Height: 6-3 | Weight: 315
LSU commit helped the Saints to an undefeated season and 5A state title.

Height: 6-5 | Weight: 305
One of the best all-around offensive lineman in the country has already landed 30 FBS offers.

Height: 6-1 | Weight: 220
The 2018 Freshman of the Year accounted for over 4,700 yards of total offense (3,128 passing, 1,581 rushing) and 71 touchdowns.

Height: 6-0 | Weight: 175
Helped Cougars to first state championship game appearance since 1960. Connected on 16-of-19 field goals as a junior.

Second Team Defense

Height: 6-5 | Weight: 250
Made an impact on defense and helped Trojans to first state title since 2015 and a No. 12 spot in the MaxPreps Top 25.

Height: 6-4 | Weight: 300
Top-rated defensive tackle in the Class of 2022 dominated in the trenches during his junior year.

Height: 6-3 | Weight: 325
Raiders won their first state title since 2002 and Alexander was a standout player for the No. 8 team in the country.

Height: 6-3 | Weight: 215
Expect the Power 5 offers to start coming for "Deuce" after a strong junior season. He racked up 13.5 sacks and 19 tackles for loss playing against Arizona's best competition.

Height: 6-2 | Weight: 200
Top-rated outside linebacker dominated on both sides of the ball.

Height: 6-4 | Weight: 220
Selected to the Ohio All-State first team after registering 61 tackles, six tackles for loss, four sacks, four forced fumbles and an interception. The Ohio State commit added 594 yards rushing and six touchdowns on offense.

Height: 6-4 | Weight: 215
Can line up anywhere on defense and play at a high level. The Ohio State pledge checks in as the third-rated outside linebacker in the Class of 2022 on 247Sports.

Height: 6-3 | Weight: 190
Eighth-rated prospect in the Class of 2022 can lock down any wide receiver in the country.

Height: 6-1 | Weight: 200
Played a major role on defense for the No. 4 team and three-time defending 6A state champs.

Height: 6-1 | Weight: 170
Quarterbacks rarely looked his direction during his junior season and he also shined on offense in 2020.

Height: 6-5 | Weight: 220
Ohio State commit was named the MaxPreps Kansas Player of the Year after a strong junior season.

Height: 6-3 | Weight: 195
Magic happens when he gets his hands on the ball. The five-star prospect impacts the game at high level in all three phases.

Height: 6-3 | Weight: 180
Averaged better than 41 yards per punt and connected on 15-of-17 field goals. Was a first team selection on the Georgia All-State team as a kicker.
High school basketball: NFHS opens door for states to adopt 35-second shot clock - HIGHSCORE
High school basketball: NFHS opens door for states to adopt 35-second shot clock
Beginning with the 2022-23 season, states can decide to adopt and use a 35-second shot clock for high school basketball games. The National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) approved the measure that leaves open the door for major change across the hardwood landscape in coming years.

Nine states use either a 30- or 35-second shot clock, but the adoption of Rule 2-14 says that each state association may adopt a shot clock beginning in the 2022-23 season — according to guidelines outlined in the Basketball Rules Book — to encourage standardization among states.

“We provided the committee with a lot of information regarding the shot clock, including responses to a 46-question survey sent to states currently using a shot clock,” said Theresia Wynns, NFHS director of sports and officials and liaison to the Basketball Rules Committee.

Prior to the 2020-21 season, the Georgia High School Association approved a phase-in of a 30-second shot clock for all varsity boys and girls basketball games, becoming the ninth state to adopt a shot clock.

The Peach State joined California, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York, North Dakota, Rhode Island, South Dakota and Washington as the only states to use a 30- or 35-second shot clock.

Guidelines approved by the NFHS include displaying two timepieces connected to a horn that is distinctive from the game-clock horn, and using an alternative timing device, such as a stopwatch at the scorer’s table, for a shot clock malfunction. The guidelines also allow for corrections to the shot clock only during the shot-clock period in which an error occurred and the officials have definite information relative to the mistake or malfunction.

Although a proposal for a national rule mandating a shot clock was not approved, the ruling is likely to bring momentum to the shot-clock movement across high school basketball.

According to the most recent NFHS High School Athletics Participation Survey, a total of 540,769 boys participated in basketball in 18,617 schools, and 399,067 girls participated in the sport in 18,210 schools across the country. It is the third-most popular sport for boys and girls.

The NFHS paved the way for states to adopt a 35-second shot clock, like the one used in the 2019 Washington 3A semifinals.
File photo by Paul Caldwell
The NFHS paved the way for states to adopt a 35-second shot clock, like the one used in the 2019 Washington 3A semifinals.